MONDAY  |  NOV. 1, 2021  |  4:00 PM | Zoom Link

For a link to watch the lecture, email caplectures@bsu.edu.
The lecture is approved for AIA continuing education credit. If you would like credit, let us know when you write for the link.

Projects worldwide are transforming coastal communities to better prepare for climate change. Autumn Visconti, RLA, ASLA, will give an overview of the BIGU’s East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, BQPark, and BiodiverCity, exploring the concept of “social infrastructure” and how multi-purpose design solutions can provide several benefits by linking infrastructural systems with equitable public open space.

 

Learning Objectives:

Work from BIG project.

  1. Learn how resiliency projects can be more than infrastructural solutions by creating multi-functional and dynamic urban assets.
  2. Understand how combining technical solutions with strategic urban planning can generate new forms of public open space.
  3. Explore how design can help lead the conversation in city planning, why it matters, and how it contributes to educating people about the profession.
  4. Gain insight on how public process can help support innovative design solutions while gaining momentum to solve complex urban problems.

BIO

Autumn is a senior associate at Local Office Landscape and Urban Design (LOLA). Since joining LOLA, her approach has been devoted to public realm projects in better preparing cities and communities for climate adaptation and promoting social justice through environmental equity. Most recently, Autumn led the design and implementation of the East Side Coastal Resiliency (ESCR) and the Brooklyn-Queens Park (BQP), with Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), two of BIG’s largest infrastructure and planning efforts in New York City. Before joining BIG, Autumn was a project designer for James Corner Field Operations, having built parks that range in scale and region from Miami to Chicago and throughout New York City.

Autumn has been an Urban Design Forum Forefront Fellow since 2019, focusing on economic, equitable, and environmental adaptation strategies for the City of New York.

She is the recipient of the 2018-2019 Outstanding Recent Alumna from the College of Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech. She is also the 2011 recipient of the national ASLA student honor award and the 2010 VA ASLA Certificate of Honor.